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What’s The Best 650w PSU In The Market?

A lot of first time builders and enthusiasts often overlook an important component for their gaming rigs: the power supply. Power supplies are important because it serves as the lifeblood of the PC. Without it, your PC won’t just run at all.

They are often overlooked because of several factors:

  • The tech specs are too difficult to understand sometimes
  • It’s difficult to find out what brands make an efficient power supply
  • Budget constraints can take its toll

A modular power supply is just as important as choosing what kind of RAM or GPU to run with your rig, and in this article, we’re going to go over the best 650 PSU or power supply unit in the market right now.

We consider them to be the best 650W PSU because of their features and pricing.

What Is The Best 650w PSU For You?

Listed below are the best 650w power supplies in the market. We’ll take note of certain features like top notch build quality, incredible efficiency, and other details.

These are not arranged in any particular order, so feel free to go over any noe of them and see which is the best for you.

EVGA SuperNOVA 650

EVGA SuperNOVA 650 GA 80+ Gold Best 650w PSU

Technical Specs

  • Combined +3.3V and +5V output: 120W
  • +12V output: 649.2W
  • +5Vsb output: 15W
  • -12V output: 3.6W
  • Operating Temperature: 0° to 50°C
  • Weight: 2.64 kg or 5.82 lbs
  • Dimensions: 86mm x 150mm x 150mm (HxWxL)
  • Price: $130+

Why Consider It?

  • +80 Gold efficiency
  • 10 years warranty
  • Provides support for Eco Mode, which helps keep the PSU quiet during low to medium workloads
  • Full support for DC to DC conversion
  • Fully modular power supply

Why Avoid It?

  • A lot more expensive than other brands
  • Does not have surge protection, fan failure protection features, and inrush current protection
  • No semi-passive operation

First on our list is the EVGA SuperNOVA 650w, which you can find for about $60 to $130 online. The SuperNOVA lineup of power supplies is widely known for their top notch build quality, rectifiers, and capacitors. Power delivery is also very reliable especially during full workloads.

The EVGA SuperNOVA 650w is based on an OEM design from FSP and boasts of a 10-year warranty, 80+ Gold efficiency, 100% Japanese capacitors, and 135mm high-quality industry grade fan.

Because the EVGA SuperNOVA 650w is fully modular, power cables are easy to organize. If you’re ever in the market for a power supply, the EVGA SuperNOVA 650w is a solid pick.

Thermaltake Toughpower GX1

Thermaltake Toughpower GX1 RGB 600W 80+ Gold Best 650w PSU

Technical Specs

  • Combined +3.3V and +5V output: 100W
  • +12V output: 588W
  • +5Vsb output: 12.5W
  • -12V output: 6W
  • Operating Temperature: 5° to 40°C
  • Dimensions: 86mm x 140mm x 150mm (HxWxL)
  • Price: $80+

Why Consider It?

  • High quality components
  • 80+ Gold Certification
  • Compact power supply

Why Avoid It?

  • A bit pricey
  • No OCP, OTP, UVP surge protection

Up next we have the Thermaltake Toughpower GX1, and it’s difficult to not include this bad boy on this list. The Thermaltake Toughpower GX1 is an excellent power supply and is one of the few PSUs that have an RGB feature, so if you have an RGB build in mind, this might be worth considering.

The Thermaltake Toughpower GX1 may not be a fully modular PSU, but it does allow you to vertically mount the unit. This is a common feature found in most Thermaltake’s Core cases, so you’re more likely to pair those cases with the Thermaltake Toughpower GX1.

The Thermaltake Toughpower GX1 comes with 80+ Gold efficiency rating, 120mm hydraulic bearing fan with 10 RGB LED lights, and a dedicated RGB lighting button that allows you to control color and RPM.

The Thermaltake Toughpower GX1’s capacitor is Japanese and can tolerate max temperatures up to 105°C.

Silverstone Essential ET650-B

Silverstone Essential 650W 80+ Bronze Gold Best 650w PSU

Technical Specs

  • Combined +3.3V and +5V output: 120W
  • +12V output: 600W
  • +5Vsb output: 15W
  • -12V output: 3.6W
  • Operating Temperature: 0° to 40°C
  • Dimensions: 86mm x 140mm x 150mm (HxWxL)
  • Price: $73 to $78

Why Consider It?

  • High quality components
  • Silent operation
  • Compact design and lightweight
  • OVP, SCP, OPP, OCP Support

Why Avoid It?

  • 80+ Bronze Certification
  • No UVP, surge protection, or fan failure protection

The Silverstone Essential 650E is a robust power supply unit despite being Bronze-rated. If it had a Gold rating, this would be the best pick amongst 650w power supplies.

Just like Thermaltake, Silverstone is a well-known manufacturer for power supplies, so you can’t go wrong with picking this one. The Silverstone Essential 650E also comes in a sub-$80 price range, making it a cheap PSU for people on a tighter budget than most.

SeaSonic S12III 650W

SeaSonic S12III 650W 80+ Bronze Best 650w PSU

Technical Specs

  • Combined +3.3V and +5V output: 120W
  • +12V output: 648W
  • +5Vsb output: 12.5W
  • -12V output: 3.6W
  • Operating Temperature: 0° to 40°C
  • Dimensions86mm x 140mm x 150mm (HxWxL)
  • Price$69.99

Why Consider It?

  • Seasonic is a respected brand for power supplies
  • Extremely quiet operation
  • Full support for OVP, SCP, OCP, and OPP
  • Compact design

Why Avoid It?

  • A little pricey
  • 80 plus Bronze certification
  • No surge protection, UVP, OTP, fan failure protection, and inrush current protection

Another respectable brand is Seasonic, known for not only their power supplies but also other components. The brand is widely respected in the industry and experts have classified Seasonic PSUs to be some of the best in the PSU market.

On this list, they have the Seasonic S12III and comes with an 80+ Bronze Efficiency rating. Combined with a 5-year warranty, the Seasonic S12III is a cheap PSU but with high efficiency that’s competitive with other PSUs in the market.

The Seasonic S12III comes with a 120mm sleeve bearing fan that helps you regulate the fan speed and giving you more control for noise output. It’s not exactly a guaranteed silent operation with the Seasonic S12III, but the noise output is respectable enough.

Enermax Cyberbron

Enermax Cyberbron Best 650w PSU

Technical Specs

  • Combined +3.3V and +5V output: 110W
  • +12V output: 552W
  • +5Vsb output: 12.5W
  • -12V output: 3.6W
  • Operating Temperature0° to 40°C
  • Dimensions: 86mm x 140mm x 150mm (HxWxL)
  • Price$49.99

Why Consider It?

  • High quality components
  • UVP, OVP, SCP, and OPP support
  • Compact design
  • Affordable

Why Avoid It?

  • No surge protection, UVP, OTP, fan failure protection, and inrush current protection

Just because it’s a cheap PSU doesn’t mean that it’s a bad choice. The Enermax Cybertron is on this list for a good reason. First, it’s one of the few 650w power supplies in the market that’s under $50 and with Bronze+ certification. It also has all the common features of the other power supply units on this list, so there’s nothing to hate about the PSU.

You also get a 3-year warranty with the Enermax Cybertron, so definitely a solid choice for people who’re looking for entry-level hardware or those on a tight budget.

The Wrap Up

The best power supplies in the market don’t need to cost you an arm and a leg, but you’ll definitely need to set aside some funds for it.

Power consumption is going to be the biggest point of consideration when it comes to picking power supplies. Of course, if you are going to run an Nvidia RTX graphics card on your rig, you’ll need more than 650w for these power hungry components.

But if you’re just getting started and you don’t mind getting one of the 650w power supplies, then you just need to go for something that’s at least 80 plus gold certified.

Modular PSUs are also good for consideration if aesthetics is one of your goals in building a rig. Modular PSUs are great at managing power cables than non-modular ones, but they’ll be a bit more expensive though.

James Stephenson

james stephenson profile picJames is a gaming and tech enthusiast. He has been playing computer games since the Commodore 64 days in the 80s. He has worked as a Broadcast Engineer with BBC News and knows a thing or two about building, fixing, and playing with PCs.